Classic Yachts

Archive

The aim of the Classic Yachts Archive is to provide enthusiasts with a useful, easy-to-consult publication that contains all of the essential information on the protagonists of the rallies and regattas that keep the culture of classic sailing alive over the world.

 

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Vintage Yachts, Classic Yachts and Spirit of Tradition

The boats that take part in classic and vintage boat rallies and regattas are divided into three different categories: Vintage Yachts, Classic Yachts and Spirit of Tradition. The measurement and racing rule for Vintage and Classic Yachts is periodically published by the Comité International de la Méditerranée (Cim). It defines Vintage Yachts as being built from wood or metal and launched before December 31st 1949 , while Classic Yachts are built from metal or wood and launched before December 31st 1975 . The Spirit of Tradition Yachts are craft which are built after 1970, along classic lines, but using modern materials and techniques. They must have a look that is true to traditional designs. Other categories are Replica Vintage Yachts (craft that regardless of their launch date have been built in compliance with pre-1950 designs) and Replica Classic Yachts (craft that regardless of their launch date, have been built in compliance with pre-1976 designs).

Other classes may be designated from regatta to regatta based on the type of boat. Some examples are: the Metre Classes (the International 12-metre Class, the International 8-metre Class, the International 6-metre Class, the International 5.5-metre Class etc.), the Big Boats (yachts of over 30 metres), the J-Class or even classes of historic one designs, such as the Dragon. Different rankings are created for each class.

The Cim Rating Rule, which was also adopted in Argentina and at Cowes for the America’s Cup Jubilee in 2001, is exclusively for monohull sailing yachts of over 7.5 metres (or under, if decked).

To allow very different yachts to compete together, each one is given a rating, a number calculated using a formula that takes numerous parameters into account, including the boat’s age, length, rig and sail area. This coefficient is then used in another formula to determine its Seconds Per Mile (Spm) i.e. by how many seconds per mile the real time required by every boat must be reduced by to obtain a suitable handicap time. This information appears on the Rating Certificate which is drawn up for each boat by the Technical Committee of each national classic sailing association and has to be renewed each year.

The national classic sailing associations making up the Cim are: Associazione Italiana Vele d’Epoca (Aive), founded in Italy in 1982 , Association Française des Yachts de Tradition (Afyt), founded in France in 1994, Association Monégasque Bateaux Classiques (Ambc), founded in Monaco in 1999, and the Real Asociación Nacional de Cruceros (Ranc), founded in Spain in 1974.

Sailing rigs

Marconi or Bermudan sloop

This is the most popular type of rig consisting of just a single mast with a single triangular mainsail aft, and a single triangular headsail (a genoa or a gib).

Fore and aft or gaff sloop

The mainsail is four-sided, fore and aft rigged, and controlled at its head by a spar known as the gaff. A gaff sloop has just one headsail. Another triangular sail may be set between the head of the mainsail and bottom of the mast. This is known as a gaff-topsail.

Marconi or Bermudan cutter

There is always just one mast with a triangular mainsail and two or more headsails (the staysail and the jib).

Fore and aft or Gaff cutter

The mainsail is four-sided with a usually wooden spar, known as the gaff, along its head. There are two or more headsails (the staysail and jib). Another triangular sail may be set between the head of the main and bottom of the mast. This is known as a gaff-topsail.

Marconi or Bermudan schooner

There may be two or more masts (three-masted/four masted-schooner etc.). Sometimes the masts may be the same height. However, in a classic schooner, the smaller forward mast is known as the foremast, while the taller aft one is known as the mainmast. The sails set on the masts are triangular.

Fore and aft or Gaff schooner

There may be two or more masts (three-masted/four-masted schooner etc.). Sometimes the two masts may be same height. However, in a classic schooner, the smaller forward mast is known as the foremast while the taller aft one is known as the mainmast. The sails set on masts are fore and aft rigged i.e. four-sided.

Marconi staysail schooner

There can two or more masts (three-masted/four masted schooner, etc.). Sometimes the masts may be the same height. However, in a classic schooner, the smaller forward mast is known as the foremast, while the taller aft one is known as the mainmast. The sail set on the mainmast is triangular, but between the main and foremast there are also one or more triangular sails on one or more steel lines, known as stays, which link the two masts.

Marconi or Bermudan ketch

In both cases, there are two masts and the sails are triangular. The taller mast is forward and is known as the mainmast, while smaller one aft is the mizzenmast. In a ketch the mizzenmast is located forward of the rudder post.

Fore and aft or Gaff ketch

There are two masts and the sails are square (fore and aft). The taller mast forward is known as the mainmast, while the smaller one aft is the mizzenmast. In a ketch the mizzenmast is located forward of the rudder post.

Marconi or Bermudan yawl

In both cases, there are two masts and the sails are triangular. The taller mast is forward and known as the mainmast, while the smaller one is aft and known as the mizzenmast. In a yawl, the mizzen mast is astern of the rudder post.

Fore and aft or Gaff yawl

In a gaff yawl, there are two masts and the sails are square (fore and aft). The taller, forward mast is known as the main mast while the smaller aft one is known as the mizzenmast. In a yawl, the mizzenmast is astern of the rudder post.

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Anne Sophie

Vintage Yacht

Marconi sloop (8 m I.R.)

Year 1938
Shipyard Bjarne Aas (Fredrikstad – Norway)
Naval architect Bjarne Aas (Fredrikstad – Norway)
Loa 14,88 m
Lwl 9,88 m
Beam 2,48 m
Draft 2 m
Displacement 10 tons
Sail area 82 m²

The International 8-metre Class Anne Sophie was one of two contenders, along with the Johan Anker-designed Sira, for the honour of representing Norway in the 1940 Olympics. Sira, now restored and sailed by the King of Norway, emerged victorious. Anne Sophie’s first owner was Nordal Wallem who’d taken sailing bronze in the 1936 Olympics. She stayed in Scandinavia until 2006 when she was purchased by a German owner, Hanns Georg Klein, who had her renovated. In the 8-metre regattas, including Kiel in 2010, she competes under the Neptune Trophy Rules which take into account how close yachts are to their original condition. In 2006, 2008 and 2009, she participated in Les Voiles de St Tropez; in 2009, 2010 and 2011, she also took part in the Régates Royales at Cannes. Anne Sophie is based at Starnberg in Germany.